Unfolding the Fold

Arik & Tal
December 23, 2006

Note: Since posting the data in this article, we have collected and analyzed much more detailed information regarding scrolling behavior of visitors. The research below reveals information about the location of the fold as well as some basic information about visitors’ scrolling behavior.

For more advanced research about statistical models for page scrolling behavior and visitor attention at each point in the page, please see the more recent research we have published in 2007 (ClickTale Scrolling Research Report V2.0 - part 1 and part 2). 

Web designers and usability professionals have debated the topic of web page scrolling since 1994. At the early days of the web, most users were unfamiliar with the concept of scrolling and it was not a natural thing for them to do. As a result, web designers would design web pages so that all the important content would be “Above the fold” or even worse, squeeze the entire page into the initial screen area. This practice of “squeezing” continues even today.

Nowadays, scrolling has become a natural practice in surfing the web. Scrolling is also associated with web 2.0 design because big, clear text and “spacious”, “clean” content implies longer web pages.

In this post, we will demonstrate with charts and real data several behavioral patterns related to scrolling. Let’s start!

The Data

As always, this research is based on data that we collect with our service (ClickTale). We used a subset of about 120,000 page-views dated November 2006 to December 2006. In this research we will be analyzing only vertical scrolling behavior. The service records the height of the web pages, the height of the window and the bottom-most location the user scrolled to.

Global Statistics

  • 91% of the page-views had a scroll-bar.
  • 76% of the page-views with a scroll-bar, were scrolled to some extent.
  • 22% of the page-views with a scroll-bar, were scrolled all the way to the bottom.

These statistics demonstrate that the vast majority of web designers are designing pages with scrolling, that the majority of users do scroll and that a significant portion of them scroll all the way to the page bottom. While 22% may seem low at first, it is actually quite high as many page-views are repeat views where the visitors have previously scrolled all the way to the page bottom and are already familiar with the page. In addition, visitors often find what they are looking for near the beginning of the page and may not bother scrolling further down.

Do Visitors Scroll to the Bottom of the Page?

If we take a look at the next chart, we may reach the “faulty” conclusion that users don’t like to scroll far down the page. The chart shows how far down visitors reach in pixels (ScrollReach) when they scroll in pages with a scroll-bar:

scrollreachabs sm Unfolding the Fold

It seems that most users only scroll 500 to 900 pixels (about one or two screens) and probably don’t scroll all the way to the bottom; however that’s the wrong conclusion. The reason that’s wrong is because users’ scrolling is highly dependent on the height of the pages being scrolled. This dependence is clear when one looks at the distribution of the height of the pages in the next chart:

pageheight sm Unfolding the Fold

By eliminating this dependency and calculating the relative ScrollReach, we observe a completely different pattern. The following chart shows the distribution of the percent of the page visitors see as a fraction of the page height for pages with a scroll-bar:

scrollreachrel sm Unfolding the Fold

The 100% bar clearly dominates all others and shows that 22% of the visitors scrolled all the way to the bottom.

Still not convinced? Maybe this distribution is only true for short pages. Not so, see the distribution for longer pages that are 4000 to 4100 pixels high:

scrollreach4000 sm Unfolding the Fold

Obviously, this doesn’t mean people read the entire page, it just means that many (in this case 23%) scan it all the way to the bottom. And how much of the bottom of the page do they actually read? Let’s leave that for another time.

Are Long Pages Bad?

As shown in the previous section, visitors do scroll to the bottom of the page. But are they less likely to scroll to the page bottom if the page is really long? The answer is no, as can be seen in the next set of charts:

scrolledtobottom sm Unfolding the Fold

Visitors are equally likely to scan the entire page no matter the page size.

scrolledto90 sm Unfolding the Fold

Visitors are equally likely to scan almost the entire page (more than 90%) no matter the page size.

Yet another Reason to Unfold the Fold

Still, you may claim that it is a good idea to place the most important information above the fold of the web page, and, to some degree, you are correct. But where exactly is this “fold”? Unlike newspapers, the fold of a web page has no fixed location. Each user sees a different height of the viewable area depending on his screen size, window size, browser and browser add-ons. Let us confuse you even more by showing the distribution of the fold location in our data set:

fold sm Unfolding the Fold

As you can see, the fold location is concentrated around three peak areas. The peaks are located at about 430, 600 and 860 pixels. Do you recognize these sizes? No? These fold sizes correspond to the three most popular screen resolutions used today: 800×600, 1024×768 and 1280×1024. Except that they are missing about 170 pixels that correspond to the most common size of the non-client area of the browser. The dispersion around these peaks is accounted for by variations in screen size, window size, browsers and browser add-ons. Newer, wide screen formats add even more dispersion to the distribution of the fold. Note that the highest peak, located at 600 to 610 pixels, accounts for less that 10 percent of the folds. So, where is the fold? It’s all over the place!

Recommendations

  • Don’t try to squeeze your web page and make it more compact. There is little benefit in “squeezing” your pages since many visitors will scroll down below the fold to see your entire page.
  • Since visitors will scroll all the way to the bottom of your web page, make life easier for them and divide your layout into sections for easy scanning.
  • Minimize your written text and maximize images, visitors usually don’t read text – they scan web pages.
  • Encourage your visitors to scroll down by using a “cut-off” layout.
  • Signup for the ClickTale beta program to gain insights about your website’s usability including visitor scrolling behavior.

Conclusion

Browser: Do not try and find the fold. That’s impossible. Instead… only try to realize the truth.
Designer: What truth?
Browser: There is no fold.
Designer: There is no fold?
Browser: Then you’ll see, that it is not the fold that matters, it is only yourself.

No related posts.

242 Comments

  1. UIE Brain Sparks » Blog Archive » Says:
    December 26th, 2006 at 2:15 pm

    [...] Over on the ClickTale Blog, there’s new data to support what we’ve been saying all along: people like to scroll and, when they do scroll, they are more likely to succeed. [...]

  2. Sitestone » Blog Archive » Scrollen niet langer een probleem Says:
    December 28th, 2006 at 10:10 am

    [...] Onderzoek van Clicktale laat zien dat het grootste deel van de webdesigners webpagina’s ontwerpen waar je op moet scrollen, dat het grootste deel van de bezoekers scrollt en dat een aanzienlijk deel daarvan helemaal naar beneden scrollt. [...]

  3. User Kind Blog » Blog Archive » Unfolding the fold Says:
    December 28th, 2006 at 8:05 pm

    [...] Clicktale recently published some findings from their analytics data that reveal some interesting things about user behaver when it comes to scrolling. They used a subset of 120,000 page views from 11/06-12/06. Their service records the height of the web pages, the height of the window and the bottom-most location the user scrolled to. [...]

  4. Arik Says:
    December 28th, 2006 at 9:13 pm

    http://digg.com/design/Unfolding_the_Fold_Do_visitors_scroll_webpages_Where_is_the_fold

  5. Holger Dieterich - Web Konzepter » links for 2006-12-30 Says:
    December 29th, 2006 at 7:24 pm

    [...] ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold How many users scroll down on web pages? (tags: webdesign usability research study design) [...]

  6. Skrentablog Says:
    December 31st, 2006 at 1:11 pm

    There is no fold…

    Fascinating data from a company called Clicktale regarding whether users scroll below the fold or not on web pages. Clicktale has some magic that records user sessions using your website and can replay them to provide usability data. Cool. This……

  7. sickofmusic.com » Scrolling usability Says:
    January 1st, 2007 at 9:14 am

    [...] http://blog.clicktale.com/?p=19#more-19Â [...]

  8. Petitpois » Click Tale Says:
    January 3rd, 2007 at 7:27 am

    [...] Outra coisa legal: a empresa têm divulgado estudos feitos a partir dos dados dos participantes do beta em seu blog. O post mais recente fala sobre scroll, e quebra alguns mitos. É claro que a amostra analisada é pequena e não pode contar como um estudo científico, mas os resultados já são bastante interessantes: [...]

  9. Référencement, Design et Cie Says:
    January 4th, 2007 at 7:09 am

    Quel comportement de l’utilisateur face au scrolling ?…

    On a longtemps recommandé de minimiser voir d’éviter les scrolls verticaux (aussi appelés ascenseurs), bien qu’il aient pourtant été adoptés assez rapidement par les utilisateurs (Voir par exemple cette alerte de Jakob Nielsen de 1999).

    Un…

  10. iStudio » links for 2007-01-04 Says:
    January 4th, 2007 at 12:42 pm

    [...] ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold Studying behavioural patterns related to scrolling – how important is your “above the fold” web page real estate? (tags: design layout usability research marketing statistics Web web2.0 writing scrolling) [...]

  11. Qui a peur du grand méchant scroll? at Noodles Says:
    January 5th, 2007 at 3:39 am

    [...] Lu sur SBillard et ClickTaleBlog : le scroll vertical est un comportement acquis par les internautes. Dans les grandes lignes les 3 stats importantes sont les suivantes : [...]

  12. Le blog eCommerce » Blog Archive » Revue de Web… Says:
    January 5th, 2007 at 6:27 am

    [...] Une étude de l’agence ClickTale analyse le comportement des utilisateurs face aux barres de défilement et aux pages longues sur les sites Web. Conclusion : 76% des pages comportant un ascenseur vertical sont scrollées, et 22% le sont jusqu’au bout. Le plus étonnant, c’est que ces 22% concernent parfois des pages très longues, jusqu’à 10 000 pixels de haut. De quoi bousculer pas mal d’idée reçue chez certains sites Web. [...]

  13. yappaBlog » Blog archief » Scrollen is not bad! Says:
    January 6th, 2007 at 5:30 am

    [...] Met harde cijfers uitgelegd in Unfolding the Fold. [...]

  14. » #21 Gebruikersonderzoek: voorzichtigheid geboden - Djust blog Says:
    January 9th, 2007 at 6:57 am

    [...] Vergelijk dit onderzoek, waarbij ca. 120.000 pageviews tussen november en december 2006 werden geanalyseerd. Veruit de meerderheid van de bezoekers scrollde (76%), vaak tot helemaal onderaan de pagina (22%). Ook bleek dat de lengte van de pagina geen effect had op het scrollgedrag van de bezoekers. Om het scrollen te vergemakkelijken, is wél belangrijk dat je gebruikmaakt van een ‘afgesneden’ ontwerp en duidelijk zichtbare vlakken die snel gescand kunnen worden. [...]

  15. ClickTale Blog » ClickTale’s Crazy Web Analytics Contest Says:
    January 11th, 2007 at 5:55 pm

    [...] A report analyzing where the page fold is located (http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/). [...]

  16. MNteractive » Three-Click Rule Isn’t and There Is No Fold Says:
    January 12th, 2007 at 3:29 pm

    [...] Bonus: Long scrolling pages (like this one) are OK. “76% of the page-views with a scroll-bar, were scrolled to some extent.” – ClickTale Blog | Email It | Digg It | Del.icio.us It [...]

  17. tanjadebie.nl » Usabilityweb: Scrollbar mythe ontrafeld? Says:
    January 15th, 2007 at 7:16 am

    [...] » Bron: Unfolding the fold » Gevonden op: Usabilityweb [...]

  18. Riina's experience Says:
    January 17th, 2007 at 1:53 am

    care to scroll?…

    This is something I’ve always wanted to hear and what’s more important – to see proven. Having done quite some webpages, I’ve always tried to put things in one page (especially if it’s something for a company or such, didn&#8217…

  19. Denken Ãœber » ClickTale y un “concurso de estadísticas” Says:
    January 18th, 2007 at 11:17 am

    [...] Algunas de las cosas que puede mostrar es el scrolling de cada página, que te serviría para saber si hay que paginar el contenido o no; los hotspots de clicks, que te ayuda a mejorar la ubicación de los menúes… O tus anuncios; entre otras cosas. Para entenderlo mejor acá hay un screenscast del producto. [...]

  20. ElSensei Says:
    January 20th, 2007 at 5:51 pm

    As the head of creative of an interactive agency I have to say that the data you shared and the research you made makes sense for the type of site you based the study on. Users’ behavior may vary depending on the tyoe of content they’re browsing and if you read a blog I truly agree with your study, but, entertainment sites, campaign sites, ecommerce destinations or, fundamentally, online services sites won’t have the “privilege” of risking conversion on a scrolling action. Do you have any research on that?

  21. Arik Says:
    January 20th, 2007 at 7:57 pm

    ElSensei, the data we used in our research comes from several types of sites, not only blogs. In fact, I suspect that people scroll less in blogs because the freshest content is on top (at least in main pages). Eventually, any way you choose to look at it, blogs are just a sub-category of content websites.
    Like you, I suspect that there are different models for different types of site. Unfortunately, detecting the type of a site, or even deciding on what types exist is not a trivial task.
    The research is by no way complete. For example, we didn’t analyze how much time people spend looking at the bottoms of the pages. It might very well be that they merely take a hasty look.
    At this stage we don’t have further data for you, but we are always open to hear about interesting ideas for research. In fact we have lately launched a contest (http://blog.clicktale.com/2007/01/11/clicktales-crazy-web-analytics-contest/) and asked the readers for suggestions. Make sure you subscribe to our feed as we will be posting more data in this spirit.

  22. Arthur Says:
    March 13th, 2007 at 8:53 am

    Fascinating data! Thanks for sharing it. :)

  23. Jonathan Schofield Says:
    June 11th, 2007 at 9:59 am

    Extremely illuminating – many thanks for sharing the data. And thanks to Jon Hicks’s Journal post (http://www.hicksdesign.co.uk/journal/be-a-creative-sponge) for raising my awareness enough to find this via Google.

  24. Tony Dunn Says:
    June 12th, 2007 at 9:13 am

    I have to agree with ElSensei. Whether or not scrolling to the bottom is a good thing depends on the type of page.

    There’s no indication of what kind of pages are used in the test. Were they long articles/blog entries where the user’s expectation is that they are reading one single coherent piece that will continue until it’s finished? Or were they complex pages with multiple content sections and headings where users would expect to either scan or to be guided to the desired content?

    In the first case (article), a user scrolling to the bottom could be considered “success” – in that the intent is for the user to finish the article.

    In the second case (complex page), a user scrolling to the bottom could be considered “failure” – in that the piece of information that the user needed was probably somewhere in the middle of the page. If they couldn’t see that info and scrolled to the bottom searching for it, you failed in making the information sufficiently visible.

    As a result, I don’t think this piece of research is either particularly enlightening or useful.

  25. Rapsli Says:
    June 30th, 2007 at 12:26 pm

    This at least gives me some specific numbers if clients ask about it. I guess Tony is right. But it gives at least the general idea that a fold doesn’t have to be bad.

  26. Presseschau für Webentwickler - Ausgabe Juli 2007 | Dr. Web Weblog Says:
    July 9th, 2007 at 6:06 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold Benutzer haben sich mittlerweile daran gewönht, Web-Seiten komplett zu scrollen. Um eine optimale User Experience anzubieten, empfiehlt es sich, Inhalte klar und deutlich zu strukturieren. [...]

  27. Best of May/June 2007 Says:
    July 9th, 2007 at 6:07 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold “Nowadays, scrolling has become a natural practice in surfing the web. Scrolling is also associated with web 2.0 design because big, clear text and “spacious”, “clean” content implies longer web pages. This post demonstrates with charts and real data several behavioral patterns related to scrolling.” [...]

  28. Dancing with the Mythical Fold : techPersona Media Says:
    July 17th, 2007 at 12:39 pm

    [...] Now, with screen sizes much larger and users used to scrolling, Web site designers can be more expansive with their visions. Nevertheless, the debate still exists about whether to design a site to put the important information above the fold. The excellent article “Unfolding the Fold” at ClickTale blog attempts to provide an answer with hard data. [...]

  29. Folding the page - The Relentless Stream of Consciousness Says:
    July 18th, 2007 at 6:52 pm

    [...] ClickTale blog, here, takes an interesting look at how many people scroll on websites and how far, what screen resolutions are used, and whether or not a “fold” exists on online media as it does on print media. Via Jyte, here. [...]

  30. Web Design Blog - Unfold the Fold Says:
    July 23rd, 2007 at 5:44 pm

    [...] The concept of “the fold”, the vertical cut off point at which further content on a web page can only be reached by scrolling, has long been a factor that dictates web design. It’s a common client request that we as web designers endeavor to include as much as possible above the fold. But have we taken a moment to consider whether uses are happy to scroll up and down a page and also where does the fold actually occur? Well a post on the ClickTale blog tries to answer these questions with supporting statistics from 120,000 page views. Firstly, the position of the fold varies depending on screen resolution, browser window size, browser version/type and browser toolbars so it’s pretty much impossible to actually pin-point the exact position where “the fold” occurs. This therefore makes designing a page to fit a clients fold somewhat pointless. [...]

  31. GM.com » Blog Archive » Emerging Design Trends Says:
    July 24th, 2007 at 6:46 am

    [...] Personally I view this as a huge step forward for design. In many ways it is as significant as the end to the web safe palette. We now know that users are happy to scroll and although it is still good practice to keep key content above the fold, that doesn’t mean everything has to be. [...]

  32. Simplicity Rules » Says:
    July 24th, 2007 at 3:56 pm

    [...] Tarquini’s also points to ClickTale’s research on scrolling, which shows that 22% of people scroll all the way to the bottom. Considering that a good number of people probably find something click-worthy before they reach the end, that’s a high number of people scrolling way to the bottom. [...]

  33. Indirect Manipulation » Blog Archive » Out of Intention Says:
    July 25th, 2007 at 7:25 am

    [...] So yesterday on Boxes and Arrows, longtime AOL veteran Milissa Tarquini took the opportunity to question the sanctity of the fold and provided some data to back up her assertions: Screen performance data and new research indicate that users will scroll to find information and items below the fold. There are established design best practices to ensure that users recognize when a fold exists and that content extends below it … [...]

  34. kevin redman Says:
    July 25th, 2007 at 6:37 pm

    Anyone have an facts on how this correlates with shopping behavior?
    conversion rates, etc?

  35. blog.dsetia.com» Blog Archive » Blasting the Myth of the Fold Says:
    July 25th, 2007 at 7:58 pm

    [...] 3 ClickTale’s Research Blog, December 23, 2006: Unfolding the Fold Source: [Link] [...]

  36. Information Design and The Myth of The Fold | Erik Mednis: Future Forward Says:
    July 26th, 2007 at 9:40 am

    [...] Great stuff. She enlists an unlikely ally, Jakob Nielsen, and references a few good articles, particularly this one from clicktale. Enjoyed It ? Share It ! :These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. [...]

  37. Best of May/June 2007 at Design Resources Says:
    July 27th, 2007 at 6:18 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold “Nowadays, scrolling has become a natural practice in surfing the web. Scrolling is also associated with web 2.0 design because big, clear text and “spacious”, “clean” content implies longer web pages. This post demonstrates with charts and real data several behavioral patterns related to scrolling.” [...]

  38. Musings on User Experience - It’s Not the Fold That Matters. It’s What You Do With It at robscherer.com Says:
    July 29th, 2007 at 10:23 pm

    [...] Some great research on user scrolling behaviour breaks down the age old (well, since 1994) necessity to squeeze everyting important ‘above the fold’. The research makes sense but as I’ve learned, not everything that makes sense is accepted by business people when they demand their content appears ‘above the fold’. [...]

  39. offline.pl » SkoÅ„czmy z mitem nieprzewijajÄ…cych użytkowników Says:
    August 2nd, 2007 at 6:45 am

    [...] Statystyki “przewijalnoÅ›ci” [...]

  40. Dr John Says:
    August 3rd, 2007 at 6:46 am

    It’s nice to read that 22% of users do scroll to the bottom of the page.

    Which is another way of saying that 78% of users do NOT scroll to the bottom.

  41. Use the Fold To Sell Your Blog on the First Impression Says:
    August 6th, 2007 at 12:46 pm

    [...] The good news is that readers do not have anything against scrolling down the page. Of course, they will only do that under two conditions: [...]

  42. Evolving Design Standards: The Fold » Viget’s Four Labs Says:
    August 10th, 2007 at 6:41 am

    [...] Other relevant articles that Milissa cites: Jared Spool’s Utilizing the Cut-off Look to Encourage Users To Scroll Jakob Nielsen’s Changes in Web Usability Since 1994 ClickTale’s Unfolding the Fold [...]

  43. Vitamin Features » Home Sweet Home Says:
    August 14th, 2007 at 4:40 am

    [...] It would seem that the idea comes from the very early days of the web, when users were unfamiliar with its conventions. I suspect this perception has primarily come from the early reports of Jakob Nielsen. However, this is unfair, because by 1997 he was already saying that things had changed. What is more, a recent report seems to indicate that over three quarters of users will scroll a page at least to some extent, with 22 percent scrolling all the way to the bottom. While 22 percent may seem low, the report actually suggests it is quite high. It argues that the results are distorted by repeat visitors who would have previously already scrolled all the way to the page bottom and be familiar with its content. [...]

  44. Monitr » Blog Archive » Mythos “Below the fold” Says:
    August 14th, 2007 at 9:20 am

    [...] Eine sehr interessante Studie leistet Milissa Tarquini (Director User Interface and Information Architecture bei AOL) auf boxesandarrows zu diesem Thema (engl.). Neben einer Studie von ClickTale.com zum Thema Scrolling auf Websites, stellt sie in ihrem Beitrag eigene Beobachtungen verschiedener AOL-Websites auf. [...]

  45. Information Design Watch » People Scroll Says:
    August 20th, 2007 at 10:06 am

    [...] In a Boxes and Arrows article Blasting the Myth of the Fold, Milissa Tarquini runs through the research that shows that browser users really do scroll. Here’s just one of her examples: In [a report available on ClickTale.com], the researchers used their proprietary tracking software to measure the activity of 120,000 pages. Their research gives data on the vertical height of the page and the point to which a user scrolls. In the study, they found that 76% of users scrolled and that a good portion of them scrolled all the way to the bottom, despite the height of the screen. Even the longest of web pages were scrolled to the bottom. [...]

  46. 800 x 600: Design for suckas at Ravi Vora Says:
    August 22nd, 2007 at 12:48 pm

    [...] While all of the cutting edge websites are designing for 1024 x 768 and above, big industries are still focused on the ugly half-brother (ok, 3/4-brother) for usability. However, even from a usability standpoint, the likelihood of someone running 800 x 600 and having the capability to run their snazzy flash banner is very unlikely. They are probably using IE4 on a Pentium III trying to barrel through their text-only version browsing experience wondering, “Where are all the frames and animated gifs?” They just don’t make the internet like they used to. Instead, we have expandable websites, SVGs, and flash. Scrolling isn’t the problem either since most people expect to scroll in a Web 2.0 environment (more information on, statistics about, and knowledge of a “foldless” internet can be found here) [...]

  47. fuzzz.gaulin.ca » » Blasting the Myth of the Fold Says:
    August 27th, 2007 at 5:10 pm

    [...] 3 ClickTale’s Research Blog, December 23, 2006: Unfolding the Fold Social Bookmarks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. [...]

  48.   Writing the Web by Best Web Design Resources. Says:
    August 29th, 2007 at 9:58 am

    [...] The “fold” is a term from the newspaper world. When a newspaper is on the stand, it is folded in half; only the top stories are “above the fold”. In web terms, “above the fold” is the area that can be seen in the browser without scrolling. Invariably every client I work with wants everything on the home page, and all of that content above the fold. I then take a breath and tell them “people scroll, don’t worry about the fold”. The clicktale blog has a great article about how the fold is no longer an issue. Do yourself a favor, go read the article and then put the fold issue out of mind. [...]

  49. Usability myths and professionals « AlastairC Says:
    September 9th, 2007 at 6:31 am

    [...] Jakob Nielsen has done much to publicize usability, but you do have to take care when things are simplified too much, or assumed to be sacred. For example, he used to say people wouldn’t scroll (mistake 6), but this isn’t the case anymore (e.g. 22% scroll to the bottom in this sample, and most scrolled to some degree). [...]

  50. Enough with the Fold, already « disinformation architecture Says:
    September 9th, 2007 at 6:35 am

    [...] So, to sum things up, we’re not averse to looking for information on our own. And since scrolling is pretty much part of your everyday experience when you’re using computers, why should it be any different when it comes to the Web? Posted by Suffian Rahman Filed in Accessibility, Development, Advertising, Design [...]

  51. ClickTale Blog » ClickTale Scrolling Research Report V2.0 - Part 1: Visibility and Scroll Reach Says:
    October 5th, 2007 at 10:00 am

    [...] our previous report entitled “Unfolding the Fold”, we analyzed web visitors’ scrolling behavior and determined the effect of the so-called [...]

  52. David Low» Blog Archive » links for 2007-10-09 Says:
    October 9th, 2007 at 5:36 pm

    [...] ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold Statistics to disprove notions about users not scrolling long pages. (tags: usability fold stats webdesign) [...]

  53. StanShinn.com | Designing Above the Fold: Does it Matter? Says:
    October 11th, 2007 at 5:35 pm

    [...] interesting study from ClickTale gives detailed behavioral patterns related to scrolling. Some [...]

  54. ABC Digital Futures » Blog Archive » How long is long enough? Says:
    October 16th, 2007 at 5:46 pm

    [...] quoted research provided by Clicktale which suggests that talking about “the fold” in today’s web environment is [...]

  55. Usability Notes - by Chris Baker Says:
    November 28th, 2007 at 10:56 am

    Below the fold might not be below the salt…

    I received a useful comment from reader Arium on my post Tabs, used right. Arium was helpfully pointing me to some interesting research from ClickTale on whether people scroll down past the fold (the point where a long web page…

  56. Joy Says:
    December 10th, 2007 at 11:53 am

    Designers need to consider how people try to access or re-access information located in the middle of a page. In an extremely long page such as this one, it’s pretty annoying to try and find a paragraph somewhere in the middle when the scroll bar itself becomes so small. It’s much easier to find a paragraph in the middle of the second or third page of several rather than find it amid a larger set of content in a single page.

    I am all for scrolling, but designing super-long pages is still not without consequence.

  57. Tim Madden » Blog Archive » ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold Says:
    December 13th, 2007 at 5:47 am

    [...] ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold Thank God someone has some data that we can use to get clients around this fascination with ‘the fold’…. scrolling is one of the many things that sets the web apart from the print world, its a powerful tool to have, let’s use it like everyone else does!!!!!!! [...]

  58. Dan Beach Says:
    December 18th, 2007 at 11:38 am

    Thanks for the fascinating research. We’ve long believed the vertical scroll was a very efficient way to present “front page” information effectively. This seems to confirm that. We’ll be passing this along to our clients.

  59. Mini Design Class: Don't Let the Fold Scare You, Part Deux at TRENDWATCH DAILY Says:
    December 18th, 2007 at 12:09 pm

    [...] to a study by Clicktale: – 91% of the page-views had a scroll-bar. – 76% of the page-views with a scroll-bar, were scrolled [...]

  60. 4SALE Digital Studio » Blog Archive » Click or scroll? that’s the question Says:
    December 21st, 2007 at 9:00 am

    [...] el propósito de un sitio web. Hay un extenso estudio sobre este tema que vale la pena leer, en Unfolding the Fold donde las estadísticas arrojan [...]

  61. Er standard kolonnelayout det beste? - Kuttisme.no - En blogg om internettmarkedsføring, webutvikling og webanalyse Says:
    January 2nd, 2008 at 6:40 am

    [...] Brukere er villige til å scrolle ned på en side. Hvis brukere tror, eller får indikasjoner på at de finner mer relevant informasjon lenger ned på siden, er de villige til å scrolle nedover på en nettside. [...]

  62. Center Line Idea Log » Blog Archiv » Get Your Scroll On Says:
    January 3rd, 2008 at 5:57 pm

    [...] or not keeping web content “above the fold” is necessary. It draws heavily on the ClickTale research found here. As a quick definition, the “fold” of a webpage is the end of viewable content in a [...]

  63. 隐居豆腐店 » Blog Archive » 转:页面长度与用户行为的一些数据 Says:
    January 8th, 2008 at 9:34 pm

    [...] 以色列公司 ClickTale 在 06 年底的时候发布了他们针对 120,000 次页面浏览(06 年 11 月至 12 月)数据统计分析的报告,主要分析了页面长度和用户拖动滚动条之间的关系(不包括横向滚动条,以下提到的滚动条都是指纵向滚动条)。下面是部分内容摘要: [...]

  64. Relativeren van de vouw Says:
    January 27th, 2008 at 3:17 pm

    [...] ‘de vouw’ op een pagina en het squeezen van blinkende informatie op deze ruimte, kan dit onderzoek van ClickTale handig zijn. Hierin wordt onder andere gemeten waar de vouw zich bevindt en hoe bezoekers scrollen. [...]

  65. O mito da rolagem « Arquitetura de Informação Says:
    February 20th, 2008 at 7:07 pm

    [...] estudo feito pela ClickTale com 120 mil páginas da web entre novembro e dezembro de 2006 traz algumas justificativas e [...]

  66. Musings | The fold - How the mouse wheel changed everything. Says:
    March 1st, 2008 at 9:47 am

    [...] to scroll less to view your content. This makes the ‘fold’ virtually non-existent. A 2006 study by ClickTale suggested that 91% of page-views had a scroll bar and 76% users scrolled the page to [...]

  67. JML Research > Dancing with the Mythical Fold Says:
    March 7th, 2008 at 9:43 am

    [...] to design a site to put the important information above the fold. The excellent article “Unfolding the Fold” at ClickTale blog attempts to provide an answer with hard [...]

  68. Jonathan Briggs Says:
    April 6th, 2008 at 5:17 am

    This is so useful for those of us who end up arguing with those of our clients who want to bound everything in a 800 x 600 box – big thanks.

  69. My fold isn’t your fold « Scottish Web Folk Says:
    April 21st, 2008 at 5:56 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold on ClickTale Blog (December 2006) [...]

  70. » Het relativeren van de vouw op Een visie op ontwerpen en concepten voor Media op Michel Kuik.nl » Blog Archief Says:
    May 7th, 2008 at 1:29 pm

    [...] ‘de vouw’ op een pagina en het squeezen van blinkende informatie op deze ruimte, kan dit onderzoek van ClickTale handig zijn. Hierin wordt onder andere gemeten waar de vouw zich bevindt en hoe bezoekers scrollen. [...]

  71. O mito da rolagem « Ex Vertebrum Says:
    May 7th, 2008 at 9:41 pm

    [...] Silvia Melo postou uma [excelente] pesquisa da Click Tale sobre o mito da rolagem. Depois que o Chuck Norris da usabilidade matou o mito dos 3 cliques, agora [...]

  72. InterLink Headline News 2.0 — Interlink Headline News nº 4859 del Martes 20 de Mayo Says:
    May 21st, 2008 at 6:27 am

    [...] tiene un excelente informe: Unfolding the Fold en el cual afirman que los usuarios realizan el scroll hasta los pie de las páginas cualquiera sea [...]

  73. grundyhome.com » Blog Archive » False Consensus Effect Says:
    June 15th, 2008 at 7:29 am

    [...] this for the next time that you hear someone claim that nobody scrolls. Or that everyone knows you can click the logo in the header to get to the homepage. Share this [...]

  74. Court ou long ? « Ecrire pour le web Says:
    June 22nd, 2008 at 6:28 am

    [...] sur l’utilisation de la fonction de défilement et sa fréquence sur les sites Web, voir le blog de ClickTale (en anglais) et ce billet de Jean-Marc [...]

  75. Darren Jones Design » Blog Archive » Emerging Design Trends Says:
    July 2nd, 2008 at 10:06 am

    [...] for design. In many ways it is as significant as the end to the web safe palette. We now know that users are happy to scroll and although it is still good practice to keep key content above the fold, that doesn’t mean [...]

  76. Above the fold « Andri Says:
    July 12th, 2008 at 3:18 pm

    [...] Unfolding the fold This entry was written by Andri and posted on júlí 12, 2008 at 9:18 pm and filed under Web development. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL. « New version of Dohop is live [...]

  77. Intense Minimalism • Web Design Hint: Scroll, not Fold. Says:
    August 19th, 2008 at 10:41 am

    [...] pubblicati da ClickTale, basati su analisi effettuate a partire dal loro servizio di tracciamento (2006/12, 2007/10, 2007/12). Due invece sono del sito User Interface Engineering, che fa alcune osservazioni [...]

  78. Fuel Conference « Netspired’s Weblog Says:
    August 20th, 2008 at 8:47 am

    [...] to some extent. 22% of the page-views with a scroll-bar, were scrolled all the way to the bottom. http://blog.clicktale.com/?p=19 Just remember that users are scrolling pages! Prioritize your content – the most important [...]

  79. Idearium » Blog Archive » Web Design Hint: Scroll, not Fold. Says:
    August 22nd, 2008 at 8:49 am

    [...] pubblicati da ClickTale, basati su analisi effettuate a partire dal loro servizio di tracciamento (2006/12, 2007/10, 2007/12). Due invece sono del sito User Interface Engineering, che fa alcune osservazioni [...]

  80. Outerspace/ Innerspace » Blog Archive » Find the Elusive “Fold” in UI Design Says:
    September 8th, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    [...] stats and UI recos from one blog on “unfolding the [...]

  81. Web Site Design Stats Debunk the Myth About Keeping Content Above the Fold « Corporate Branding and Design Says:
    September 25th, 2008 at 11:10 am

    [...] 25, 2007 by brandinganddesign There is an excellent study posted on the ClickTale blog titled “Unfolding the Fold” that provides some hard stats about the fold and scrolling in general. These statistics demonstrate [...]

  82.   Veel cijfers over scroll-gedrag en “beneden de vouw” kijkers | Webanalisten.nl Says:
    September 25th, 2008 at 6:24 pm

    [...] Deel 0: Unfolding the fold [...]

  83. Everybody scrolls? - scroll behaviour and webdesign Says:
    September 28th, 2008 at 4:41 am

    [...] and figures Last week, reading webanalisten.nl, I came across research (part 1, part 2 and part 3) from Clicktale about scrolling behaviour, scroll reach, visitor attention and [...]

  84. Screen Resolutions – What do your visitors actually see? | bg Theory, LLC Says:
    October 9th, 2008 at 8:07 am

    [...] more people are scrolling overall, and some companies are ‘debunking the fold’; every time I most actions on a site to below the fold, I see conversion rates [...]

  85. Usability Webrichtlijnen voor overheidswebsites? - Ferry den Dopper’s blog Says:
    November 10th, 2008 at 5:12 pm

    [...] over meerdere pagina’s (in plaats van scrollen op één pagina).” Achterhaald idee. Scrollen is niet eng. Echt [...]

  86. Vitamin - All content » Blog Archive » Home Sweet Home Says:
    December 10th, 2008 at 6:47 am

    [...] this is unfair, because by 1997 he was already saying that things had changed. What is more, a recent report seems to indicate that over three quarters of users will scroll a page at least to some extent, [...]

  87. Know when to fold ‘em | UID Blog Says:
    February 21st, 2009 at 9:10 pm

    [...] Unfolding the Fold [...]

  88. Designing above the page fold at Candyjar - David Ward Says:
    March 10th, 2009 at 4:07 am

    [...] Does the fold exist? – read more [...]

  89. Why the “Fold” Doesn’t Matter Anymore | Locus of Control Says:
    March 13th, 2009 at 3:44 pm

    [...] the screen and the user is forced to scroll down in order to see more. ClickTale started with some preliminary research and later published two articles summarizing the results of the main study. The preliminary [...]

  90. Talk:2, o Blog da Talk » Quebrando de vez o mito da rolagem Says:
    May 4th, 2009 at 8:23 am

    [...] estudo feito pela ClickTale com 120 mil páginas da web entre novembro e dezembro de 2006 apontam algumas justificativas e [...]

  91. O mito da barra de rolagem » Blog da Webroom Says:
    May 12th, 2009 at 12:16 pm

    [...] existem alguns fatos sobre o assunto que já são considerados antigos. Segundo uma pesquisa divulgada pelo ClickTable de pesquisa realizada em 2006, 91% das páginas web no mundo possuem rolagem, 76% dos usuários [...]

  92. Kaydırma Çubuğu Kullanım Araştırması at Userspots Says:
    July 6th, 2009 at 1:29 pm

    [...] Kaynak:http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/ Zaman: July 6, 2009 Etiketler: [...]

  93. 5 Fast & Easy Reports to Optimize Your Site | Weight Watch Says:
    July 12th, 2009 at 11:27 pm

    [...] While the average scroll reach across all pages was 86%, scroll reach drops by about 50% when page height doubles in length. Read more about visitor scrolling behavior here. [...]

  94. Blog » Blog Archive » Quebrando de vez o mito da rolagem [Web Design] Says:
    July 19th, 2009 at 12:18 pm

    [...] estudo feito pela ClickTale com 120 mil páginas da web entre novembro e dezembro de 2006 apontam algumas justificativas e [...]

  95. How to deal with ‘too much information’: where should we put search refinement facets? « Dana’s user experience blog Says:
    July 28th, 2009 at 7:57 pm

    [...] are viewing search results, which is a good thing. However, given that the vast majority of users don’t scroll all the way down, and only look at the first couple of pages of search results (and they look more at the first [...]

  96. Selling ads without a sales force: A close look at PaperG’s Flyerboard » Nieman Journalism Lab Says:
    August 4th, 2009 at 6:01 am

    [...] ads have to appear “above the fold” of a web site — visible, that is, even to the many visitors who don’t scroll. That’s a major restriction for web [...]

  97. Andrew Fox, Brighton & London Based Graphic Web Designer Says:
    September 2nd, 2009 at 1:34 am

    [...] there is more content below. There are more good reasons for unfolding the fold – Here’s a good article for more [...]

  98. News sites need to scroll : Core Economics Says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 4:01 pm

    [...] same principle guides twitter, friend feed and now Facebook. You read by scrolling. And there is some evidence that this is the [...]

  99. Above the fold « Interaction design Says:
    September 18th, 2009 at 8:51 am

    [...] http://www.slideshare.net/chuckmallott/rethinking-fold http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/ http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2006/08/02/utilizing-the-cut-off-look-to-encourage-users-to-scroll/ [...]

  100. Know when to fold ‘em | Have You Seen This Yet? Says:
    September 21st, 2009 at 6:43 pm

    [...] Unfolding the Fold (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)  Loading … [...]

  101. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines « Smashing Magazine Says:
    September 24th, 2009 at 8:09 am

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  102. » 10 nasvetov za dobro uporabniÅ¡ko izkuÅ¡njo spletnega mesta » Oglasevanje.com – novomedijska promocija in napredno oglaÅ¡evanje Says:
    September 25th, 2009 at 3:13 am

    [...] Jakoba Nielsona (in tudi druge) je pokazala, da le 23 % uporabnikov uporablja drsnik pri svojem prvem obisku spletnega [...]

  103. torresburriel.com » Archivo » Diez descubrimientos de usabilidad que funcionan Says:
    September 28th, 2009 at 4:30 am

    [...] mayoría de los usuarios utilizan y hacen scroll. Fuentes: Unfolding the Fold, Paging vs. Scrolling: Looking for the Best Way to Present Search Results y Blasting the Myth of [...]

  104. Fantablog » Le mythe du « page fold » Says:
    October 10th, 2009 at 2:04 am

    [...] sujet n’est pas nouveau, mais une étude récente de CXPartners enfonce le clou : les internautes sont habitués à naviguer [...]

  105. Diez descubrimientos de usabilidad que funcionan « Blog de Sira Says:
    October 15th, 2009 at 5:29 am

    [...] mayoría de los usuarios utilizan y hacen scroll. Fuentes: Unfolding the Fold, Paging vs. Scrolling: Looking for the Best Way to Present Search Results y Blasting the Myth of [...]

  106. Ten Useful Web Usability Findings and Guidelines | Situated Research Says:
    October 20th, 2009 at 8:21 am

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  107. Wawrzyniec Niewodniczański (wawrzek) 's status on Monday, 26-Oct-09 10:49:48 UTC - Identi.ca Says:
    October 26th, 2009 at 4:50 am

    [...] To fold or not to fold your website? The question has been answered: http://blog.clicktale.com/?p=19 [...]

  108. Consejos de usabilidad que intentaré seguir | Blog General de Medios Says:
    October 30th, 2009 at 12:54 pm

    [...] Unfolding the fold (Clicktale) [...]

  109. מילון ×ž×•× ×—×™× שמיש « מידע שימושי Says:
    November 9th, 2009 at 4:05 pm

    [...] unfold the fold – מתוך הבלוג של חברת clicktale [...]

  110. Víctor Edier » Blog Archive » 10 consejos de Usabilidad Says:
    November 12th, 2009 at 7:08 pm

    [...] mayoría de los usuarios utilizan y hacen scroll. Fuentes: Unfolding the Fold, Paging vs. Scrolling: Looking for the Best Way to Present Search Results y Blasting the Myth of [...]

  111. Above the Fold — The Myth that Hurts « Eli’s Says:
    November 13th, 2009 at 3:12 am

    [...] experts are start­ing to notice that too. Three years ago Click­Tale ana­lyzed 120,000 page-views and dis­cover that 91% of the pages had scroll-bars, 76% of the page-views with [...]

  112. 10条有用的可用性结论和指南_UEDspace Says:
    November 17th, 2009 at 11:32 pm

    [...] ï¼šå°†æŠ˜å å±•å¼€ (Clicktale), 分页与滚动 ( 威之卡大学 – SURL), æ‰“ç ´æŠ˜å çš„ç¥žè¯ [...]

  113. links for 2009-11-18 | Visualrinse | Design and Development by Chad Udell Says:
    November 18th, 2009 at 5:06 pm

    [...] del.icio.us ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold WireLust » Blog Archive » AS3 port of SEOmoz | How to Ruin a Web Design – The Design 15 [...]

  114. Iona.LABS » links for 2009-11-18 Says:
    November 19th, 2009 at 3:20 pm

    [...] ClickTale Blog » Unfolding the Fold Web designers and usability professionals have debated the topic of web page scrolling since 1994. At the early days of the web, most users were unfamiliar with the concept of scrolling and it was not a natural thing for them to do. As a result, web designers would design web pages so that all the important content would be “Above the fold” or even worse, squeeze the entire page into the initial screen area. This practice of “squeezing” continues even today. See the original post here at Visualrinse | Design and Development by Chad Udell No comments [...]

  115. ClickTale’s Fascinating New Insights into Visitor Behavior | StepForth Web Marketing Inc. Says:
    November 19th, 2009 at 6:49 pm

    [...] many users are actually spending more time than previously thought navigating below the fold. Here is the full article for you to read – it is well worth it! by Ross Dunn, CEO, StepForth Search Engine Placement Inc. Permalink to this article: [...]

  116. Scrolling on web pages is good for you | Articles | Content Formula Says:
    November 24th, 2009 at 9:24 am

    [...] users can start scrolling a page almost immediately as the content loads, and research shows that users absolutely do scroll. In fact Jakob Nielson noted that a propensity to scroll was becoming common in web users as early [...]

  117. Unfolding the Fold : Remember the User Says:
    November 24th, 2009 at 11:45 pm

    [...] Unfolding the Fold Published: November 24, 2009 Filed Under: Information Tags: fold : usability : writing Leave a Comment Name: Required [...]

  118. Hogyan tegyük felhasználóbaráttá az oldalunkat? « gballa Says:
    December 3rd, 2009 at 10:44 am

    [...] felhasználói szokások változnak, így a görgetési szokások is átalakultak. A legújabb kutatások azt bizonyítják, hogy a legtöbb felhasználó igenis görget, sőt az oldal legaljáig. Mára a többség inkább [...]

  119. De paginavouw: mensen scrollen niet… of wel? - Frankwatching Says:
    December 7th, 2009 at 1:01 am

    [...] zou denken dat korte teksten dan oplossing zijn. Maar toch is dat niet zo. Want lezers vinden scrollen de gewoonste zaak van de wereld (ClickTale, 2006). Op de ruim 100.000 onderzochte pagina’s waarop je kón scrollen, [...]

  120. » Quebrando de vez o mito da rolagemWebinsider Says:
    December 10th, 2009 at 5:06 am

    [...] estudo feito pela ClickTale com 120 mil páginas da web entre novembro e dezembro de 2006 aponta algumas justificativas e [...]

  121. Mobile Newspapers – Terence Eden has a Blog Says:
    December 10th, 2009 at 9:45 am

    [...] important to remember that users will scroll. The idea of putting important assets “above the fold” is, at best, a distraction. But [...]

  122. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines « Usability – My Love Says:
    December 18th, 2009 at 3:26 am

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  123. Time to Say Goodbye to the Pagefold? Nope! « /0 Says:
    December 18th, 2009 at 10:59 am

    [...] about the page fold being irrelevant has come from. There have been lots of studies which show that users aren’t adverse to scrolling and have become used to doing it [...]

  124. Espaço com Design » 5 dicas uteís de usabilidade e orientação Says:
    January 10th, 2010 at 9:08 pm

    [...] Unfolding the fold (Clicktale) [...]

  125. Court ou long ? : Ecrire pour le Web @ WAW Says:
    January 22nd, 2010 at 8:26 am

    [...] sur l’utilisation de la fonction de défilement et sa fréquence sur les sites Web, voir le blog de ClickTale (en anglais) et ce billet de Jean-Marc [...]

  126. recrea - aplicaciones web, accesibilidad y usabilidad en las palmas de gran canaria Says:
    January 27th, 2010 at 6:23 pm

    [...] mayoría de los usuarios utilizan la barra de desplazamiento. Fuentes: Unfolding the Fold, Paging vs. Scrolling: Looking for the Best Way to Present Search Results y Blasting the Myth of [...]

  127. Do your webpage visitors scroll ? « Writing For Digital Says:
    February 13th, 2010 at 5:53 pm

    [...] Do your webpage visitors scroll ? 2010 February 13 tags: design usability by writingfordigital With the advent of Web 2.0 and the social web it appears that more users are scrolling to the end of the page. Clicktale reported the following in a survey from the end of 2006. See the full report at http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/ [...]

  128. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines « Web Usability Says:
    February 28th, 2010 at 3:44 pm

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  129. 10 Panduan Usability untuk halaman web | ezinteractives Says:
    March 4th, 2010 at 11:19 pm

    [...] informasi lebih lanjut silakan melihat artikel Unfolding flip (Clicktale), Pager VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting The Myth of Fold (box [...]

  130. Web Design and The Fold Says:
    March 8th, 2010 at 11:11 am

    [...] opinion of some very opinionated web geeks from Preston. Check out the information in the article Unfolding the Fold if you’re still unsure. In this massively data driven article they show most visitors scroll [...]

  131. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines | Privacy Thief Says:
    March 20th, 2010 at 5:35 pm

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  132. SEO ROI » Saving Space Above The Fold In Web Page Headers Says:
    April 8th, 2010 at 6:59 am

    [...] 3. Â Clicktale has some large scale data disproving the non-scrolling myth, and some nice takeaways … [...]

  133. Think ‘Above The Fold’ When Addressing Web Design | DesignNewz Says:
    April 12th, 2010 at 7:31 am

    [...] 3.  Clicktale has some large scale data disproving the non-scrolling myth, and some nice takeaw… [...]

  134. Web 2.0 Design Says:
    May 17th, 2010 at 11:16 pm

    Excellent post. Many thanks for sharing this informative resource.
    Kudos to you :)

  135. » 5 klasse Tools, um Ihre E-Mail- & Website-Usability zu verbessern | optivo E-Mail-Marketing-Blog Says:
    May 19th, 2010 at 9:37 am

    [...] Usability-Fragen hervorbringen kann: Bis wohin scrollen Nutzer auf der Webseite (vgl. Nielsen- oder ClickTale-Erhebung) oder in der Onlineversion des Newsletters? (Wo) werden lange Formulare abgebrochen? Wo [...]

  136. Keep Important Stuff “Above The Fold”? « Rank Magic Blog Says:
    June 1st, 2010 at 12:08 pm

    [...] on a web page, but more importantly leads them to conclude that it doesn’t matter after all. <more here> No [...]

  137. We’ve lot’s of traffic but our site just won’t convert it! | Puddle Digital Says:
    June 2nd, 2010 at 7:55 am

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  138. The No Fold Philosophy: Hierarchy, Content and Strategy Eliminate Barriers « Mindgruve: The Feed Says:
    June 15th, 2010 at 9:57 am

    [...] will encourage site visitors to explore the page. In support, according to research done by ClickTale, scrolling has become a natural practice among users and is associated with forward-thinking web [...]

  139. There is no fold… and the stats to prove it | USiT Says:
    June 24th, 2010 at 6:42 pm

    [...] (an experience analytics company) published a blog post back in December 2006 smashing the “people don’t scroll myth” to bits. However, 3 ½ years later clients and colleagues still make this claim fairly regularly. So I [...]

  140. Usability Myths: “The Fold” | The Worthwhile Blog Says:
    July 12th, 2010 at 9:25 am

    [...] scroll to read this paragraph. It was the content that shaped your interaction with the page! In a study on user scrolling, ClickTale found that 91% of the page views were long enough to contain [...]

  141. Most Users Do Not Scroll Says:
    July 13th, 2010 at 11:22 am

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  142. Arsen web site design guy Says:
    July 25th, 2010 at 4:51 am

    being a web site designer myself I would say that it is almost impossible now days to design a web site that is going to fit in the main screen area. (especially for the users with the wide-screen monitors). So regardless of the data provided in this article I say who doesn’t scroll, start scrolling now!

  143. Victor Says:
    July 27th, 2010 at 11:24 pm

    Great info.
    I have always been concerned about how my pages are being used by my readers.
    In the future I´ll concentrate more on making it easy to read than on the design of the page.
    I suppose all kinds of people behave about the same in spite of the language.

    Thanks a lot

  144. Gary Lambert Says:
    July 28th, 2010 at 12:43 pm

    I have always heard keep to stay above the fold. So good information to know. Thank You

  145. Accrochez vos internautes | Aspyct Says:
    August 2nd, 2010 at 10:33 am

    [...] si le scrolling est devenu habituel, seule la partie supérieure d’une page est visible dès son chargement. De plus, les [...]

  146. Eleazar | Entrepinoy Bank Says:
    September 5th, 2010 at 1:08 pm

    I think, above the fold is always the very first place visitors hook to see and read and its the very first place administrator wants to optimized for effective results according to their action plan.

  147. 10 Usability Tips Based on Research Studies Says:
    September 15th, 2010 at 9:44 am

    [...] answer is “No” according to a report by Clicktale, a web analytics company. Their results showed that the length of the page has no [...]

  148. 10 Hướng Dẫn Hữu Ích trong Thiết Kế | VNWordPress.com | Thiết kế web Says:
    September 16th, 2010 at 10:38 am

    [...] rất nhiều khoảng trắng Để biết thêm thông tin, xin vui lòng xem các bà i viết Unfold­ing the fold (có thể nhấp chuột và o), Pag­ing VS Scrolling (Wichita Uni­ver­sity – SURL), [...]

  149. 10ä¸ªç½‘ç«™ç”¨æˆ·ä½“éªŒä¼˜åŒ–çš„ç ”ç©¶ç»“æžœï¼ˆäº”ã€ä¸å¿…æ‹…å¿ƒé¡µé¢ä¸‹æ‹‰å’Œæ»šåŠ¨æ¡ï¼‰ | 秋野小虫 Says:
    September 16th, 2010 at 8:03 pm

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  150. 10 Usability Tips Based on Research Studies | Joochee Says:
    September 17th, 2010 at 8:36 am

    [...] answer is "No" according to a report by Clicktale, a web analytics company. Their results showed that the length of the page has no [...]

  151. 10ä¸ªç½‘ç«™ç”¨æˆ·ä½“éªŒä¼˜åŒ–çš„ç ”ç©¶ç»“æžœ - css114 Says:
    September 17th, 2010 at 6:20 pm

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  152. 10ä¸ªç½‘ç«™ç”¨æˆ·ä½“éªŒä¼˜åŒ–çš„ç ”ç©¶ç»“æžœ @ 优酪网 Says:
    September 17th, 2010 at 11:04 pm

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  153. ITiger咖啡馆-网站运营-互联网观察 » Blog Archive » 用户体验优化的10ä¸ªç ”ç©¶ç»“æžœåŠå…¶æ•°æ®æ”¯æŒ Says:
    September 18th, 2010 at 11:02 am

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  154. 10 Usability Tips Based on Research Studies « Rahul Sabnis Says:
    September 18th, 2010 at 7:45 pm

    [...] answer is “No” according to a report by Clicktale, a web analytics company. Their results showed that the length of the page has no [...]

  155. Règles d'ergonomie web | Référencement Positionnement Webmarketing Says:
    September 19th, 2010 at 10:35 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold [...]

  156. [分享]10ä¸ªç½‘ç«™ç”¨æˆ·ä½“éªŒä¼˜åŒ–çš„ç ”ç©¶ç»“æžœ « UED人 Says:
    September 19th, 2010 at 8:09 pm

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  157. John W. Palmer Says:
    September 23rd, 2010 at 11:52 am

    I have to say, although this data proves that users are comfortable scrolling, it’s still up to the design of a page to even indicate that there’s more to see, thus prompting the user to head further down the page.

    Consider this a shameless plug, but aside from Google’s tool, there’s few services like this:

    http://www.foldtester.com

    Based on users’ different setups with the millions of “amazing” toolbars and add-ons to your browser, shrinking valuable viewport space, 10% of the world has less than 300px of viewport space. The site above helps you test for that.

  158. Usabilidad de sitios web: La limpieza importa, no las barras de desplazamiento | Hospedaje Web Says:
    September 30th, 2010 at 9:16 am

    [...] embargo los resultados de algunas investigaciones recientes (link en inglés) sugieren que la extensión vertical de un sitio web no tiene en realidad una influencia importante [...]

  159. 7 Praktische Tips Voor Scanbare En Vindbare Webtekst | Erik Buis Says:
    October 4th, 2010 at 1:43 am

    [...] vatten de kern van de alinea De lezer wil over je pagina kunnen scrollen — dat mensen wel degelijk scrollen, toonde ClickTale in 2006 aan — en de tussenkoppen scannen zonder te hoeven stoppen. Door alleen tussenkoppen te lezen, [...]

  160. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines | WPLaunchBox Says:
    October 4th, 2010 at 5:31 am

    [...] further information please take a look at the articles Unfolding the fold (Clicktale), Paging VS Scrolling (Wichita University – SURL), Blasting the Myth of the Fold [...]

  161. 10 consejos de usabilidad basado en estudios de investigación | Ciberdix 2.0 :: Blog Creativo!! Says:
    October 6th, 2010 at 7:29 am

    [...] respuesta es "No", según un informe de ClickTale, una compañía de análisis web. Sus resultados mostraron que la longitud de la [...]

  162. Limassol Web Design Says:
    October 14th, 2010 at 10:20 am

    I think web designers need to rethink their sites’ scrolling lengths and try to keep the homepage to one “page” or screen view

  163. UX Designer’s Quick Reference | butlerhouse Says:
    October 17th, 2010 at 6:31 pm

    [...] Unfolding the Fold – ClickTale [...]

  164. 10个网站用户体验优化的研究结果 | 创易 – 关注互联网行业创业的内容 Says:
    October 21st, 2010 at 6:34 am

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  165. Scrolling For the Vertically Challenged | Analytics Expert Blog Says:
    October 25th, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    [...] run our usability experiment, we used the ClickTale Scroll Reach and Attention Heatmaps on a blog entry over 5000 pixels long. Our goal was threefold. We wanted to [...]

  166. Cyprus Swimming Pools Says:
    October 26th, 2010 at 6:04 am

    Surely how much a person is prepared to scroll is also dependent on the screen resolution of the computer they are using.

  167. No se preocupe acerca “la tapa” y el desplazamiento vertical (scroll) Says:
    November 3rd, 2010 at 9:20 pm

    [...] Despliegue de La Tapa (Inglés) [...]

  168. 10 astuces d’ergonomie Web 2 | Référencement Positionnement Webmarketing Says:
    November 9th, 2010 at 8:59 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold [...]

  169. 10 astuces d’ergonomie Web 3 | Référencement Positionnement Webmarketing Says:
    November 9th, 2010 at 9:00 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold [...]

  170. Chris Swafford Says:
    December 16th, 2010 at 9:52 pm

    I know what you mean. I worked in newspapers for years and we put the important stories above the fold and when building websites we make sure to put the meat of the site within the visible area when one arrives on the page.
    Web Design Springfield MO

  171. Waite Creative » Why the “Above the Fold” Design Mentality Could Lead to a Bad First Date Says:
    January 8th, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    [...] http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/ « Best Practices for Direct Online Marketing Design (Part 2) [...]

  172. elweb – El “page fold” no existe Says:
    January 11th, 2011 at 10:22 pm

    [...] Unfolding the fold [...]

  173. forum Says:
    January 22nd, 2011 at 7:55 am

    Thanks for the replies!

  174. innoor » 10步提升网站的用户体验 Says:
    January 24th, 2011 at 9:49 pm

    [...] 来源: Clicktale [...]

  175. 10 советов по юзабилити сайта, основанных на результатах исследований | Says:
    January 30th, 2011 at 7:28 am

    [...] Unfolding the Fold (Разворачивая сгиб, на английском языке) [...]

  176. Användbarhet reviderad | Niklas Lehto Says:
    February 10th, 2011 at 2:41 am

    [...] är ett vanligt användbarhetstips, med gamla anor. Six Revisions hänvisar till två studier (Clicktale, CX partners) vars resultat ger oss anledning att omvärdera rekommendationerna mot vertikal [...]

  177. Social Media Marketing Says:
    February 19th, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    Very interesting post, thanks for sharing.

  178. Human-Computer Interaction, User Experience « Pixemiosis Says:
    February 20th, 2011 at 4:46 am

    [...] Article || Unfolding the fold: link [...]

  179. Anonymous Says:
    February 20th, 2011 at 8:12 pm

    [...] [...]

  180. Quebrando de vez o mito da barra de rolagem | Blog da Agência Hive Says:
    March 8th, 2011 at 10:08 am

    [...] estudo feito pela ClickTale com 120 mil páginas da web entre novembro e dezembro de 2006 aponta algumas justificativas e [...]

  181. How to make users scroll down your page Says:
    March 30th, 2011 at 1:32 pm

    [...] to tools to see how far your users are actually scrolling down, such as Clicktale. They also have some surprising research that shows that despite common design sense, users are quite likely to scroll all the way to the [...]

  182. 10 Dicas de Usabilidade Web baseadas em estudos reais | Estar na Web Says:
    April 11th, 2011 at 11:16 am

    [...] que o conteúdo abaixo da “dobra” irá mesmo ser ignorado? Claro que Não. E este estudo da Clicktale (uma empresas de estatísticas web) assim o confirma, uma vez que demonstra que o [...]

  183. Scholar Says:
    April 23rd, 2011 at 4:34 am

    Above the fold is certainly the best place to position important message but below the fold shouldn’t be left behind. Visitors will still scroll the page especially if the information is worth reading and can answer the question at hand.

  184. Conversion Rate Optimisation Says:
    April 30th, 2011 at 6:30 am

    Wow, very interesting points made here. While people do scroll below the fold, top online marketers will still tell you with only a few seconds to grab someones attention you would want to make sure your CTA (Call To Action) slaps them across the forehead (above the fold).

  185. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines | Unobtrusive Design Says:
    June 13th, 2011 at 7:17 am

    [...] [...]

  186. Myth #3: 사람들은 스크롤하지 않는다? | Clearboth Says:
    July 5th, 2011 at 11:29 pm

    [...] [...]

  187. Anonymous Says:
    July 11th, 2011 at 1:25 am

    [...] that.ClickTales has published three blog posts around their ongoing study of the fold. In their study in 2006, they found that 91% of people had a scrollbar, 76% of those scrolled, and 22% scrolled all the way [...]

  188. Jeff Wolff Says:
    July 19th, 2011 at 1:32 pm

    Thanks Arik, this is some very fascinating information

  189. To scroll, or not to scroll: is it even a question anymore? Says:
    July 25th, 2011 at 11:38 am

    [...] actually do scroll. A study from the 2006 Clicktale Scrolling Research Study of 120,000 page-views [...]

  190. 10 Usability Tips Based on Research Studies | Unobtrusive Design Says:
    August 21st, 2011 at 6:52 pm

    [...] [...]

  191. Harish Says:
    August 26th, 2011 at 4:07 am

    Really nice article. Will use the data when my clients ask me to put all things above the fold.

  192. Profitez des recherches sur l’utilisabilité pour améliorer la disposition de votre contenu | Appili Blog – L’Ergonomie Web Says:
    August 28th, 2011 at 7:33 am

    [...] clicktale.com CX [...]

  193. 10 Usability Tips Based on Research Studies | Kappa Techie's Tips and Tricks Says:
    September 9th, 2011 at 12:55 am

    [...] answer is “No” according to a report by Clicktale, a web analytics company. Their results showed that the length of the page has no [...]

  194. ThreeKinds | Intended Aesthetic Says:
    September 13th, 2011 at 5:04 pm

    [...] http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/ [...]

  195. Think ‘Above The Fold’ When Addressing Web Design - DesignNewz Says:
    September 19th, 2011 at 9:52 am

    [...] 3.  Clicktale has some large scale data disproving the non-scrolling myth, and some nice takeaw… [...]

  196. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? - Smashing Magazine Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 7:11 am

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  197. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | Freelancing Help Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 7:25 am

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  198. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | Blogs – NG Outsourcing Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 12:20 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  199. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | Ricky Noel Diancin Jr. Webmaster | Web Designer | Wordpress Expert Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 1:28 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  200. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | IdentityNepal.com Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  201. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | CS5 Design Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 6:48 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  202. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | Ruturaj Pradeep Kohok | Your Web Advisor Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 11:33 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  203. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? Says:
    September 21st, 2011 at 11:45 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  204. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | Testing themes Says:
    September 22nd, 2011 at 7:24 am

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  205. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | Wordpress Training Course Brisbane: Next Course Thur 29th Sep 2011 Says:
    September 22nd, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  206. Are Media Queries the answer to the Fold? | Boagworld Says:
    September 27th, 2011 at 4:53 am

    [...] arbitrary line which is dependant on screen resolution, window size and browser setup. What is more research has shown us that the majority of users do scroll. 76% of the page-views with a scroll-bar, were scrolled to some [...]

  207. Brave Knowledge » Usability review – Above And Below The Fold pt4: Unfolding the Fold contd Says:
    October 10th, 2011 at 2:29 am

    [...] [...]

  208. The fold is a lie! It’s time to face the truth | Octoply Says:
    October 16th, 2011 at 10:29 pm

    [...] [...]

  209. Show 85: Bulletproof | Boagworld Says:
    October 25th, 2011 at 3:51 am

    [...] hopefully the post I found this week will help. “Unfolding the Fold” is a post on the ClickTale blog that provides some hard stats about the fold and scrolling [...]

  210. » 5 klasse Tools, um Ihre E-Mail- & Website-Usability zu verbessern Campfire Says:
    October 31st, 2011 at 9:02 am

    [...] Usability-Fragen hervorbringen kann: Bis wohin scrollen Nutzer auf der Webseite (vgl. Nielsen- oder ClickTale-Erhebung) oder in der Onlineversion des Newsletters? (Wo) werden lange Formulare abgebrochen? Wo [...]

  211. Should You Make People Scroll on Your Website? Says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:37 am

    [...] [...]

  212. Pisanje za splet – škodljivi miti | Marketing Zmagovalcev Says:
    December 10th, 2011 at 4:03 pm

    [...] Obstaja mit, da ljudje na spletu berejo manj kot na papirju. Raziskave kažejo, da je ravno obratno. Obstaja tudi mit, da ljudje ne maramo brati nekaj strani dolga besedila. Tudi to je samo mit. [...]

  213. 11 Marketing Myths of 2011 | Digett Says:
    December 13th, 2011 at 1:00 am

    [...] as 2006, heat mapping research conducted by ClickTale showed that 76% of users scrolled some, with 22% scrolling all the way to the bottom, no matter how long the page. If you follow proper design techniques—and [...]

  214. Юзабилити сайта (10 советов) | SDU2.KZ Says:
    December 14th, 2011 at 9:36 am

    [...] [...]

  215. Kennis over het nieuwe bezoekersgedrag | Dare2Be Says:
    January 4th, 2012 at 5:06 am

    [...] usability findings and guidelines” (eng) En meer informatie over de scrolling gedrag: “scrolling behaviour -research report” (eng) Dit vind je vast ook interessant:De toekomst is om de hoekHelp je omgeving de [...]

  216. Jessika Says:
    January 9th, 2012 at 6:16 am

    You should have a small text at the bottom here saying “yay, you made it!”

  217. Guilherme Veras » Blog Archive » O mito da rolagem Says:
    January 11th, 2012 at 1:16 am

    [...] estudo feito pela ClickTale com 120 mil páginas da web entre novembro e dezembro de 2006 traz algumas justificativas e [...]

  218. Scrolling, Part Two — Delight in the Everyday Says:
    January 12th, 2012 at 1:22 pm

    [...] pro-white-space designs, scrolling is in the limelight — and it seems that users are warming up to the idea. Ultimately, it’s long past time for both designers and users to embrace the fold: [...]

  219. Effective Use of the Fold | ROI Labs Says:
    January 20th, 2012 at 3:52 am

    [...] [2] http://blog.clicktale.com/2006/12/23/unfolding-the-fold/ [...]

  220. 10 научно обоснованных советов по возможностям использования веб-сайтов | Интернет журнал Web 2.0 - Всё о Бизнесе в Сети Says:
    January 21st, 2012 at 8:31 am

    [...] страницу и читать дальше? В соответствии с исследованиями компании Clicktale, специализация которой [...]

  221. Aghis Says:
    February 6th, 2012 at 8:02 pm

    OMG. So bialcalsy, everything we’ve been told in the last 10 years or so regarding the stickiness of websites and how to design them is wrong from a fold POV? I suppose if you think about it – how often have you not turned over a newspaper to read whats after the fold?Also interesting is the fact that they point out that you should include content beneath the fold to encourage reading. Maybe this would be a good way to reduce bounce rates?

  222. Talya Rachel Judovits Says:
    February 7th, 2012 at 6:32 am

    Glad you enjoyed the post :-) Although every website is different and gets a different reaction from its visitors, what we are explaining here is that you should not count out putting content below the fold. If you design your content well on the page, encouraging visitors to scroll, either with good graphics or engaging text, they will. And yes, generally if visitors are scrolling on the page, they hang around longer, hence reducing bounce rates and increasing the chances of them moving forward in the conversion process.

  223. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | blog.ldesign.sk Says:
    February 22nd, 2012 at 8:53 am

    [...] [...]

  224. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? | all tech designs - Reference Guide... Says:
    March 7th, 2012 at 1:46 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  225. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? Says:
    March 9th, 2012 at 11:02 pm

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your gratification to replace a fold, we can ascribe to research finished by ClickTale. Citing examine and experts is a good ensue to pure an [...]

  226. 12 dicas sobre Landing Page, simples assim! | Bernard De Luna Says:
    March 22nd, 2012 at 11:28 am

    [...] já fiz diversos experimentos sobre e sempre levo esses estudos comigo, como do Boxes and arrows e esse mais analítico da Clicktale. Porém, tratando-se de Landing Page, existem pequenas regras para a dobra sim, pois 3 elementos [...]

  227. 10个网站用户体验优化 | UEtree.com Says:
    March 31st, 2012 at 2:58 am

    [...] [...]

  228. Usability Myths: "The Fold” | Worthwhile.com Says:
    April 20th, 2012 at 11:35 am

    [...] scroll to read this paragraph. It was the content that shaped your interaction with the page! In a study on user scrolling, ClickTale found that 91% of the page views were long enough to contain [...]

  229. Yark Says:
    June 7th, 2012 at 2:42 pm

    Would love to see this data updated for 2012 to see if any trends or most common fold lines have changed with all the new hardware that is out there.

  230. Como colocar el contenido en un website | SamuelDiosdado.com Says:
    June 20th, 2012 at 3:47 am

    [...] ninguna influencia en el hecho de que el usuario escanee el conjunto del contenido de la página (clicktale.com). Otros estudios que van más allá, explicando que un menor contenido arriba de la línea de [...]

  231. 260+ Random Facts About User Assitance (UA) and User Experience (UX) – Strategy of continuous improvement for software business Says:
    June 21st, 2012 at 8:29 am

    [...] The length of the page has no influence in the likelihood that a user will scroll down the page. [*] [...]

  232. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? |Layout to HTML Says:
    July 16th, 2012 at 4:59 am

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  233. Above the fold – Definition « SocialMediaSearch Says:
    July 19th, 2012 at 5:01 pm

    [...] [...]

  234. Are You Ready For A Web Design Challenge? « CreativeDesignBox Says:
    July 27th, 2012 at 12:50 am

    [...] afield, too. For example, when justifying your decision to ignore the fold, you can refer to research done by ClickTale. Citing research and experts is a great way to justify an [...]

  235. | Digiinfo Systems Says:
    August 28th, 2012 at 9:06 am

    [...] [...]

  236. Screen Resolutions – What do your visitors actually see? | Certified Knowledge Says:
    October 13th, 2012 at 4:06 pm

    [...] [...]

  237. Clicking takes a counterpunch | Wylie's Writing Tips Says:
    October 21st, 2012 at 12:27 pm

    [...] to the Scrollers’ argument is ClickTale research that shows that 22% of people in one usability study scrolled to the bottom of the Web page. I [...]

  238. Clicking takes a counterpunch | Wylie Communications, Inc. Says:
    November 6th, 2012 at 10:32 pm

    [...] to the Scrollers’ argument is ClickTale research that shows that 22% of people in one usability study scrolled to the bottom of the Web page. I [...]

  239. 10 Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines | Sarah Meares Says:
    November 13th, 2012 at 4:45 am

    [...] [...]

  240. The myth of the fold Says:
    November 14th, 2012 at 4:11 pm

    [...] Unfolding the Fold [...]

  241. Eyetracking and church websites | St. Eutychus Says:
    December 2nd, 2012 at 4:41 am

    [...] Here’s another study on scrolling and “the fold.” [...]

  242. Jasa Desain Grafis Says:
    January 23rd, 2014 at 1:26 am

    Thank you for sharing your info. I really appreciate your efforts and
    I am waiting for your further post thanks once again.

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